The Maintenance Difference
We all know somebody with an older, high-mileage vehicle that keeps on running year after year—that crazy uncle in the high-mileage ride that keeps on going strong. So what’s the secret?

The secret is that there is no real secret to getting a vehicle to last a long time. The difference is maintenance. Regular fluid checks and an almost pious dedication to scheduled lubrication will keep the powertrain going strong. What kind of oil, brake fluid, and grease used is just as important as changing. The best oil in the world will do your engine no good if you never change it. Cleaning and protecting the finishes of the vehicle inside and out will keep things looking good. Paint, plastic, leather, and fabric need help survive the constant assault of the sun and elements.

Tip 1: Check and change the oil. No single step will help an engine last more than regular oil and filter changes will. Conversely, nothing will destroy an engine faster than neglecting oil-level checks or fresh-oil changes.

Tip 2: Flush the cooling system and change coolant once a year. A 50/50 mix of coolant and distilled water will keep the cooling system in good shape and prevent corrosion and deposits from building up inside the cooling system.

Tip 3: Change out transmission and differential oils. While not requiring frequent service, these fluids must be changed according to service intervals. Always use transmission fluid or gear oil of the recommended type and viscosity.

Tip 4: Keep it clean. While washing the outside of the vehicle is obvious, almost everything the vehicle ran over can also get stuck to the underside. Hosing off winter salt and road grime is a good idea.

Tip 5: Everything with moving parts needs grease to survive. This ball joint went into early retirement due to poor lubrication.

Tip 6: Nothing keeps paint looking good and protected like a coat of quality wax. Apply wax at least every six months.

Tip 7: Driveline components such as u-joints also require regular lubrication. The driveline may have to be removed to access the zerk grease fitting.

Tip 8: Protect the interior plastic by parking the vehicle in the shade, using a window deflector screen, and applying a UV protectant to prevent the plastic and vinyl from drying out.

Tip 9: Inspect, clean, and repack wheel bearings with wheel bearing grease according to service intervals. Wheel bearings and grease are inexpensive compared to spindle and hub replacement or liberated wheels rolling down the road ahead of you.

Tip 10: Brake fluid is hygroscopic. This means it is adept at attracting moisture. Moisture causes components to corrode and fail. Replace fluid and bleed system once a year. Brake fluid is cheap. Calipers, hoses, and sensors are expensive.

As one of the most susceptible states to hail damage, here are some tips on how to prevent car hail damage and protect your car or truck. Ways to prevent hail damage to your vehicle Thunderstorms can spring up quickly, making it nearly impossible to know when exactly your car or truck will be susceptible […]


With classes now starting for many college and universities, students all over the country are leaving their parents’ homes and moving into on- and off-campus housing near their respective campuses.
If you have a student getting ready to attend college, there are a number of important insurance considerations to take into account including property and liability insurance, auto insurance, and health insurance.
Below is a list of recommendations we have put together to ensure both you and your child are properly covered while he or she is away at school.
If you have any specific coverage questions at all, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our office.


1. Dorm Inventory You should put together a list of any items your student plans on taking to school, especially any high value items like computers, cameras, tablets, and musical instruments.  (If you have receipts for those items, we highly recommend storing them in a safe place or scanning them into your computer.)  That way if a theft, fire, or other disaster occurs, you will have a list of everything and their associated values.
2. Homeowners Insurance.  Homeowners insurance policies differ in the way they will respond to your student’s personal possessions while away from home.  Some policies automatically extend the coverage to any property located away from the premises, other policies may limit the amount of coverage to a percentage of the total contents value of the policy (usually 10 percent), and some policies do not provide any coverage at all, which means that your student would need his or her own renters insurance policy.
3. Accidental Breakage.  Coverage for accidental damage and liquid spills is not provided by your homeowners insurance policy so you may want to consider a stand-alone policy for your student’s laptop, desktop, tablet, or other expensive electronics.
4. Auto Insurance.  If your child has been driving the family car and will now be at least 100 miles away at school, you may be eligible for significant policy discounts.  Likewise, if your child takes the car to school, it’s very important to let the insurance company know so that the proper coverage can be added to the policy.
5. Health Insurance.  As a student, your child is most likely eligible to be covered under your health insurance plan until he or she turns 26.   Even if your child is married, not living at your house, not financially dependent, or eligible for his or her own health insurance plan.  Full details can be found here and here.
6. Tuition Insurance.  Did you know there is insurance available to cover most (and sometimes all) of your student’s tuition and on-campus housing if he or she withdraws at any time during a semester?  Tuition insurance is available at a cost of 1 to 3 percent of your student’s tuition, and it will provide coverage if your child withdraws from school due to a covered medical reason, including emotional, nervous or mental disorders.

Homeowners and renters insurance can help you replace your possessions after a loss, but only if you file a claim in a timely and complete manner. Use these tips to get started.

1. Report the incident to the authorities. For a burglary, vandalism, fire, or other trauma, this is a vital first step. Leaky roofs, malfunctioning HVAC systems, etc., aren’t typically reasons to contact the police or fire department. If police and fire are dispatched to your residence, give them all the details of the event. Keep copies of their reports – you’ll need them when filing your insurance claim.

2. Call your insurance company. After you file the police or fire report, contact your insurance agent or company’s claims department. Your policy probably requires you to do so within a certain amount of time after the loss. When you call, have all of the details of the incident, plus your policy number.

3. Complete a claims form with your agent. This form includes all the details of the incident. Be thorough – note what was damaged, when, and how. For smaller claims, filing a claims report should suffice. For larger losses, your agent may send an adjuster to inspect the damage.

4. Document the damages. Before you begin cleanup, photograph, or record the damage and include the images with your claim. It’s a good idea to document your home and belongings before a loss visually, so you have “before” and “after” images when filing a claim.

5. Make temporary repairs, so your home is safe and livable. While you’re waiting for your claim to be processed, you may make temporary repairs. But review your policy for guidelines about what’s covered, and be sure to save your repair receipts. Don’t start permanent, major repairs or renovations until your claim is complete and your compensation is confirmed.

6. If you have to move temporarily, save your receipts. If the damage to your residence is so extensive that you must relocate for a while, your policy may help cover those costs. Save hotel and restaurant receipts – and discuss with your agent how to submit them for reimbursement.

7. Make yourself available. Be reachable and ready to talk with your insurance agent and claims adjuster after you file a claim. The faster you can answer questions and provide the necessary information, the faster your claim can be processed.

Flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster in the United States, causing an average of $50 billion in economic losses each year. Most U.S. natural disasters declared by the President involve flooding.

There is no coverage for flooding in standard homeowners or renters policies or most commercial property insurance policies. Coverage is available in a separate policy from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) and a few private insurers. Despite efforts to publicize this, many people exposed to the risk of floods still fail to purchase flood insurance.

And, in light of the recent devastating floods experienced in the South, we thought it would be essential to shed some light on what flood insurance covers, how it is purchased, and provide an idea on the associated premiums.

WHAT’S COVERED

Building

  • The insured building and its foundation
  • Electrical and plumbing systems
  • Central air conditioning equipment, furnaces, and water heaters
  • Refrigerators, cooking stoves, and built-in appliances such as dishwashers
  • Permanently installed carpeting over unfinished flooring

Personal Property

  • Personal belongings, such as clothing, furniture, and electronic equipment

WHAT’S NOT COVERED

  • Damage caused by moisture, mildew, or mold that could have been avoided by the property owner
  • Currency, precious metals, and valuable papers such as stock certificates
  • Property and belongings outside of an insured building such as trees, plants, wells, septic systems, walks, decks, patios, fences, seawalls, hot tubs, and swimming pools
  • Living expenses such as temporary housing

FLOOD INSURANCE FOR BASEMENTS AND AREAS BELOW THE LOWEST ELEVATED FLOOR

Coverage is limited in basements regardless of zone or date of construction. It’s also limited in areas below the lowest elevated floor, depending on the flood zone and construction date. These areas include:

  • Basements
  • Crawl spaces under an elevated building
  • Enclosed areas beneath buildings elevated on full-story foundation walls that are sometimes referred to as “walkout basements.”
  • Enclosed areas under other types of elevated buildings

MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS

Homes and businesses with mortgages from federally regulated or insured lenders in high-risk flood areas must have flood insurance. While flood insurance is not federally required if you live in a moderate-to-low-risk flood area, it is still available and strongly recommended.

RATES

The NFIP, a federal program, offers flood insurance, which can be purchased through most leading insurance companies. Rates are set and do not differ from company to company.

These rates depend on several factors, including the date and type of construction of your home, along with your area’s level of risk. Most premiums include a Federal Policy Fee and ICC Premium. If your community participates in the Community Rating System (CRS), you may qualify for an insurance premium discount in some communities of up to 45% if you live in a high-risk area and up to 10% moderate-to-low risk areas.
30-DAY WAITING PERIOD

Typically, there’s a 30-day waiting period from the date of purchase before your policy goes into effect. Here are the only exceptions:

  • If flood insurance is being purchased connected with the making, increasing, extending, or renewing your loan.
  • If a building has been newly designated in the SFHA and flood insurance is purchased within the 13-month period following a map revision.
  • If flood insurance is required due to a lender determining that a loan that does not have flood insurance coverage should be protected by flood insurance.
  • If an additional amount of insurance is selected as an option on the renewal bill.
  • If a property is affected by flooding on burned Federal land resulting from or is exacerbated by post-wildfire conditions when the policy is purchased within 60 days of the fire containment date.

Exclusions listed in a personal auto insurance policy vary depending upon what state laws permit and then your car insurance company’s guidelines.  When something is noted as excluded from your policy, it means that your policy won’t cover it.

These limitations to your coverage are important to know so that you don’t end up in a situation where you find out after an auto accident that you have no coverage — or have voided your policy.  (Remember, if your policy doesn’t cover you, then you’ll be stuck paying out-of-pocket usually.)

The most common exclusion regarding a person is a named driver exclusion.  With this, you and your insurer agree to exclude a specific person from your policy’s coverages.  This driver isn’t rated on your policy, and in return, your insurer won’t cover the individual if found driving your car.
Here’s a look at some of the most common exclusions found in the different parts of a personal auto insurance policy.

Bodily and property damage liability exclusions

Most policies plainly state they don’t provide liability coverage:

  • If an insured has intentionally caused injury or property damage.
  • For property damage to property owned (or being transported) by the insured.  (So if you hit your own car, you can’t make a liability claim)
  • For property damage to property that is rented, used by, or in the insured’s care.
  • For bodily injury to the insured or any insured family member residing in the insured’s household. (Some states only allow the policy to reduce the bodily injury limits for family members to the state’s minimum)
  • For liability arising out of the vehicle’s ownership or operation being used for “livery conveyance.”   This means using your vehicle to transport goods or people for payment – so don’t use your car as a taxi or delivery service.   So, don’t use your car for delivering pizzas, or you may void your coverage.

In general, using your vehicle for business purposes can be a no-no according to your liability policy.  For example, it may say that the business of:

  • Selling, repairing, servicing, storing, or parking vehicles (other than your insured vehicles) is not covered by your liability or physical damage coverages.
  • Maintaining or using any vehicle that the insureds are using to engage in business –other than farming or ranching – may not be covered.  (If you are using your vehicle for business, see about a business-use or commercial policy)

Vehicles that are excluded from coverage (or deemed unacceptable to cover for either liability or physical damage coverages) vary, but the list may include:

  • One with less than four wheels
  • Designed for use principally off public roads or not registered for use on public roads
  • Any vehicle owned by you or a family member but isn’t listed as insured on your policy.
  • Any vehicle furnished for your regular use but isn’t listed as insured on your policy.
  • Any vehicle used to compete in a race or practice or preparing for any prearranged or organized racing or speed contest.

Some insurers have amended policies to include an exclusion for any operated, maintained, or used vehicle as part of a personal vehicle sharing program.  So, loaning your vehicle out for a car-sharing service could mean you have no personal coverages.

Physical damage coverage exclusions

Collision and comprehensive coverage are the physical damage coverages offered by auto insurers. Liability insurance covers those that you damage, collision, and comprehensive cover your own vehicle if it’s damage.

Exclusions under this portion of the policy can be similar in many ways to the restrictions listed in your liability portion of your policy.  Typically, collision and comprehensive coverage exclusions include loss or damage due to:

  • Wear and tear
  • Freezing
  • Mechanical or electrical breakdown or failure
  • Road damage to tires
  • Catastrophic events – radioactive contamination, nuclear weapon discharge, war, etc.
  • Destruction or confiscation by government or civil authorities
  • Using your vehicle for livery or delivery purposes
  • The vehicle being used for racing purposes
  • Intentional damage
  • A vehicle used in personal car-sharing programs (some insurers)

Personal items that are damaged in your vehicle or stolen from it aren’t covered, and most policies specifically mention the exclusion of coverage for losses to:

  • Any electronic equipment that is not permanently installed.
  • Custom equipment (or is covered to a specific minimal amount — such as $2,000) unless you’ve added custom parts and equipment endorsement to your policy.

If a vehicle is excluded from liability coverage, then typically, it’s also unable to obtain physical damage coverage.   However, there is some vehicle that insurers allow to obtain liability but not collision and comprehensive — such as vehicles with a salvage or rebuilt title.

Medical payments and uninsured motorist bodily injury

Medical coverages you can purchase for yourself as part of an auto insurance policy have exclusions as well.  Typically, they include injuries sustained in the circumstances mentioned above, such as catastrophic events, racing or livery service, as well as situations such as:

  • Injured on a motorized vehicle having fewer than four wheels
  • Injured while using the vehicle as a residence
  • Injuries that workers compensation benefits should cover because occurred during the course of work

Most of the time, car insurance claims are fairly routine affairs involving fender benders or storm damage. Truly bizarre claims, however, are rare and elusive. If you Google “weird auto insurance claim,” you’ll find multiple improbable rumors involving wrecks caused by drivers ogling naked pedestrians, windshields damaged in squirrel nut attacks, and even one report by a driver who claimed his windscreen melted when a plane crash-landed nearby and burst into flames.

Actually, verifiable claims are much harder to come by; however, we’ve been able to track down 5 truly off-the-wall auto insurance claims that are just as strange as they are improbable. Below are the associated stories for each of the claims.

Please remember that you can always contact our office for any auto insurance accident or claim you encounter—no matter how strange it may be. Our office will be glad to assist.

Claim 1: In December 2011, Seattle news outlets reported a bizarre story involving a mattress and a three-car pile-up. A couple had failed to tie their mattress securely to the top of their SUV. As they were driving, the mattress loosed itself from its moorings and landed in the middle of the highway, causing a three-way crash.

As two good Samaritans stopped to help, the female driver hopped back into her vehicle and fled the scene, leaving her male passenger to deal with the aftermath. Shortly thereafter, one of the good Samaritans also left. A few miles down the road, however, he spied a man’s head “bobbing around in the backseat.” It turned out to be the male passenger had stowed away, hoping to escape the accident scene undetected.

Claim 2: A driver has involved in a minor rear-end collision in which he smashed the taillight of a car ahead. He then reversed slightly to survey the damage, but in a stroke of ill-luck, he hit the front bumper of the driver behind him. Then, when he opened his door to exit his vehicle, he knocked down a passing cyclist, resulting in three insurance claims!

Claim 3: An insurance agent received a rather suspicious claim for heavy hail damage to a car. When the adjuster inspected the damage, he was skeptical that hail could have caused the perfectly symmetrical, round divots that peppered the entire surface of the damaged car.

The insurance company rejected the claim as the vehicle had been purposefully damaged, not by hail, but by a ball-peen hammer. The company figured the client would be so embarrassed at being caught in an obvious attempt at insurance fraud that he would drop the entire matter. Instead, the man filed a police report claiming that an unknown assailant had beaten his car with a ball-peen hammer! The client then filed a new insurance claim, and this time, because they couldn’t prove that the client had inflicted the damage himself, the insurance company was forced to pay the claim.

Claim 4: A farmer was driving around in his pickup truck and had his shotgun riding, well, shotgun. Arriving at his destination, the man grabbed his gun and hopped out of the cab. Unfortunately, he lost his grip, and the gun discharged. He wasn’t sure if he’d fired the gun while grabbing for it or if it went off by itself as it hit the ground.

The gun was loaded with buckshot, and while, thankfully, the man was uninjured, the truck’s interior wasn’t as fortunate. The truck’s entire cab — headliner, seat covers, and dashboard — had suffered extensive damage. Luckily, the client had comprehensive insurance, and the claim was paid.

Claim 5: In 1974, a young woman drove her beloved “hippie van” to an upholstery shop to have a fold-down bed installed in the back. The van then disappeared from the shop’s lot, and a claim was filed with her insurance company. The woman was reimbursed roughly $600 for the vehicle, which was about what she’d paid for it.

Fast-forward 35 years when U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials in Los Angeles recovered a perfectly restored, still-running VW minibus from a shipping container bound for the Netherlands. They ran the VIN (vehicle identification) number and discovered it was the same vehicle stolen from back in 1974.

Now owned by here insurance company, the minibus is worth about $25,000. The individual is hopeful that she can come to terms with her insurer and get her minibus back. One can only imagine the stories it would tell if it could talk!

Motor Vehicle Safety and Impaired Driving
Motor vehicle crashes and collisions are the leading cause of unintentional injury death across all age groups. Protecting your loved ones not only means being a better driver but also setting an example. Take the time to learn what’s safest for you and your family, including slowing down, buckling up, and staying sober behind the wheel.

​​In 2012, about 10,322 were killed in crashes involving alcohol (Injury Facts 2019). According to NHTSA, 3,952 drivers were killed in crashes while under the influence of drugs. Impaired driving means that you are using and operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or other illegal substances. Driving under the influence comes with the danger of prosecution, legal costs, and fines. Also, it increases your risk of harming someone else on the road.

Seat Belts and Air Bags
​Forty-nine states and the District of Columbia have laws requiring that people riding in cars wear seat belts. More than half of the passengers killed in 2012 were not wearing seat belts (Injury Facts, 2014). For young adults 16-24, seatbelt use was significantly lower in 2011. Seat belts can save your life and those of your loved ones. When used properly, seatbelts reduce the risk of fatal injury to passengers in the front seat by 45 percent and moderate-to-critical injury by 50 percent. Airbags help to reduce injuries sustained in car crashes. Airbags, however, are only added protection when used with seat belts.

Speeding
​Speeding kills an average of 28 people per day for a total of 10,219 people a year. There is some social pressure from others who are speeding around us on the roads, and changing the habit can be challenging. Slow down to save a life.

Children In and Around Vehicles
​Leading death causes for children ages 5 to 24 around motor vehicles include the car backing over or rolling over a child. Other injuries include kids getting trapped in the trunk, strangled by seat belts, or hurt by power windows. An increasing problem in the spring and summer months is children getting locked in hot cars and dying of heatstroke. Caregivers can prevent these injuries by teaching children that areas in or around cars are not a play area and use proper child passenger seats.

Mature Drivers
According to Injury Facts 2019, the risk of crashes with fixed objects, pedestrians, bicycles, trains, and other objects increases for individuals older than 75. Check out NHTSA resources on determining if driving is the best option for your loved ones who are older. Also, look into public transportation and accessibility for seniors.

Make Motorcycle Riding Safety Your Top Priority

Operating a motorcycle takes different skills than driving a car; however, the road laws apply to every driver just the same. A combination of consistent education, regard for traffic laws, and basic common sense can go a long way in helping reduce the number of fatalities involved in motorcycle accidents every year.

Here is a checklist that every motorcycle rider should follow:

  • Always wear a helmet with a face shield or protective eyewear — Wearing a helmet is the best way to protect against severe head injuries. A motorcycle rider not wearing a helmet is five times more likely to sustain a critical head injury.
  • Wear appropriate gear — Make sure to wear protective gear and clothing to minimize the number of injuries in case of an accident or a skid. Wearing leather clothing, boots with nonskid soles, and gloves can protect your body from severe injuries. Consider attaching reflective tape to your clothing to make it easier for other drivers to see you.
  • Follow traffic rules — Obey the speed limit; the faster you go, the longer it will take you to stop. Be aware of local traffic laws and rules of the road.
  • Ride defensively — Don’t assume that a driver can see you, as nearly two-thirds of all motorcycle accidents are caused by a driver violating a rider’s right of way. It would help if you always rode with your headlights on; stay out of a driver’s blind spot; signal well in advance of any change in direction, and watch for turning vehicles.
  • Keep your riding skills honed through education — Complete a formal riding education program, get licensed, and take riding courses from time to time to develop riding techniques and to sharpen your street-riding strategies.
  • Be awake and ride sober — Don’t drink and ride; you could cause harm to yourself and others. Additionally, fatigue and drowsiness can impair your ability to react, so make sure you are well-rested when you hit the road.

Preparing To Ride

Making sure that your motorcycle is fit for the road is just as important as practicing safe riding. Should something be wrong with your motorcycle, it will be in your best interest to find out before hitting the road. To make sure that your motorcycle is in good working order, check the following:

  • Tires — check for any cracks or bulges, or signs of wear in the treads. Low tire pressure or any defects could cause a blowout.
  • Under the motorcycle — Look for signs of oil or gas leaks.
  • Headlight, taillight, and signals — Test for high and low beams. Make sure that all lights are functioning.
  • Hydraulic and Coolant fluids — Level should be checked weekly.

Once you’ve mounted the motorcycle, complete the following checks:

  • Clutch and throttle — Make sure they are working smoothly. The throttle should snap back when released.
  • Mirrors — Clean and adjust all mirrors to ensure the sharpest viewing.
  • Brakes — Test front and rear brakes. Each brake should feel firm and hold the motorcycle still when fully applied.
  • Horn — Test the horn

With more than 8 million U.S. users and 160,000 drivers, Uber is disrupting the transportation industry in an unprecedented manner.  By leveraging technology, they (along with other ride-sharing companies) transform the way we travel, especially in crowded, urban areas.

As the ride-sharing industry continues to grow exponentially, auto insurance companies are trying to figure out how and where to provide coverage for drivers that participate in these services properly.

Most personal insurance policies exclude all livery services, and commercial insurance policies are expensive.  Many ridesharing companies provide insurance for their drivers while paying passengers in the car; however, there are still gaps in insurance coverage that each driver needs to address properly.

Q: Why are companies like Uber and Lyft getting so much attention from auto insurance companies? 

A:   These companies are attracting significant attention from auto insurance companies due to their operations — providing ride-sharing services by contracting with drivers who use their personal vehicles to transport passengers.  These drivers do not typically have a livery driver’s license, nor are their cars registered or insured as commercial vehicles.

The issue is that personal auto insurance is not designed, underwritten, or priced to handle livery-type services.  They are written for personal use vehicles that may include the transportation of family and friends.  Therefore, most personal auto insurance policies exclude all livery services as typically handled on a commercial auto insurance policy.
In fact, most policies actually stop providing coverage from the moment a driver logs onto his ride-sharing app until the app is shut off.
Commercial auto insurance policies generally carry higher limits, are underwritten to recognize that commercial vehicles travel more miles, and cover exposures not included in private-passenger policies due to the increased risk of accidents and subsequent claims.
Q: Why don’t insurance companies cover ride-sharing?
A: The short answer: Auto insurers have not yet determined how to underwrite the risks of personal-line policyholders using their private-passenger vehicles on a for-hire basis.
Given the proliferation of companies like Uber and Lyft, however, it is likely that auto insurers will at some point start to offer policies that provide motorists with coverage for both traditional private use of a vehicle and commercial vehicle use.
Q: What is the government doing as far as insurance is concerned? Do any laws govern ride-sharing and insurance?
A:  For city and state governments, the two key insurance regulation questions are:

  1. Must ride-share drivers be licensed in the same way that taxi and other for-hire drivers are?
  2. If private-passenger policies do not cover ride-share drivers when working, how do they become properly insured?

Though many municipalities have yet to address the concerns above properly, some governments have already passed bills that insurance requirements and regulations for ride-share drivers.

For example, California recently passed a bill with the following requirements:

  1. Requires all ride-sharing companies to disclose to drivers upfront that the driver’s personal insurance policy will not apply while using their private-passenger vehicle for work activities.
  2. Requires commercial insurance from the moment the driver logs onto the app until the driver logs off.
  3. Clarifies that their commercial insurance is primary coverage.
  4. Requires the ride-sharing liability insurer to defend and indemnify drivers when they have a claim or accident while on assignment.
  5. Ensures coverage is not dependent on a private-passenger auto insurer first declining coverage.

Q: How can prospective drivers learn if they have sufficient coverage?

A: Prospective drivers should ask their ride-sharing company what level of coverage it provides. Most ride-sharing companies provide insurance coverage for their drivers, but only when they have a paying passenger in the vehicle.
Drivers should also contact their own auto insurer to address gaps, if any, in their liability protection. It is also recommended that ride-sharing drivers review a copy of their company’s insurance contracts to know the exact terms and conditions of the coverage.